CSE News

CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard on the Facebook data breach

In this video, CSE PhD Student Matt Bernhard weighs in on the matter Facebook data harvesting, such as that done by Cambridge Analytica. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

Fall 2018: Quantum Nanotechnology

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Duncan Steel
Prerequisites: MATH 215, MATH 216, PHYSICS 240 and co-req of EECS 230 or equivalent

Course Description:
The development and application of nano-technology is impacting nearly all the fields of engineering, from those who are developing it to those who use it. Future engineers working to design new devices will need a skill set that is considerably broadened to include the behavior of materials and devices when they becomesufficiently small. Devices like transistors and quantum well lasers have already forced engineers to understand the impact of Fermi-Dirac statistics and energy quantization on devices. However, the emergent field of nano-technology is revealing that the concepts we have from our current scale devices are no longer adequate to predict correct device experience. Moreover, in this new regime, new physical properties are emerging that may revolutionize how we think about information, its storage, transmission and processing. This course introduces students to basic concepts that are relevant to novel device concepts. The course will explore the new properties of nano-vibrators, quantum LC circuits, the role of loss, the impact of the quantum vacuum on nano-switches, coherent superposition, quantum entanglement, light (one photon at a time) and quantum information and computing. You will learn a new way to think about how things work.
[More Info]

How May Mobility Is Spearheading Autonomous Driving In The Form Of Shuttle Services

This article describes how the startup May Mobility, cofounded by Prof. Edwin Olson, to getting to market first by focusing on autonomous shuttle service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Igor Markov's duplicate text detection system now integrated with conference management software

Prof. Igor Markov's duplicate text detection system, called DUDE, is now integrated with Softconf's conference management software. Softconf is an internet company dedicated to organizing conferences, workshops and other software development events. DUDE is now integrated with their signature product, START V2, which is a web-based solution for managing peer-reviewed conferences and workshops. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Security of State Voter Rolls a Concern as Primaries Begin

This article describes steps being taken in Illinois, the lone state known to have its state election system breached in a hacking effort, regarding its election systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who points out that many of the same weaknesses present in 2016 remain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Fall 2018: Reinforcement Learning (RL)

Course No.: EECS 498-006 and EECS 598-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Satinder Baveja
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
This course will be a fast-paced programming-based introduction to both the fundamentals of Reinforcement Learning (RL) as well as some of the recent advanced and exciting ideas at the intersection of Deep Learning and RL (or DeepRL)
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Power Semiconductor Devices

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or equivalent

Course Description:
Power devices are at the heart of all modern electronics, from the power grid and renewable energy to hybrid/electric vehicles, trains, space exploration, and industrial and consumer electronics. This course will cover design and operating principles of semiconductor devices for discrete and integrated power electronics. We will discuss the power MOSFET, IGBT, HEMT, thyristors, Schottky and PIN diodes, as well as emerging devicearchitectures. We will study the semiconductor materials, device fabrication and packaging required for power devices, including Si, GaN, SiC, and Ga2O3. Students will learn numerical device modeling using commercial software (Synopsys Sentaurus and Silvaco Atlas), and will do a final group presentation on a topicof their choice.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Data Mining

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: EECS 281 or graduate standing in CSE

Course Description:
Unprecedented amounts of data are being generated daily everywhere -- on the web, social networks, mobile apps, supermarket transactions, movie and music services, traffic sensors, smart home devices, healthcare, and more. Methods for extracting nuggets of information from mountains of data are transforming the world: data-driven approaches are changing thescientific and decision-making processes and solving various societal problems. This course covers the fundamental concepts in data mining, focuses on methods and algorithms and, at thesame time, aims to equip the students with practical skills for mining of large-scale, real data. The topics that will be covered include big data systems, frequent itemsets, similarity and clusteranalysis, mining of networks / time series / data streams, and applications, such as recommendation systems, social network analysis and web search.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Green Photonics

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Zetian Mi
Prerequisites: EECS 429 or equivalent

Course Description:
Energy, water, and environmental sustainability are among the most critical challenges we face in the next decades. Green Photonics is concerned with the application of semiconductor optoelectronics including light sources, detectors, and photovoltaic devices to these problems. The most familiar photonic technologies in this field are solar cells and LED lighting, which have had an enormous and growing impact over the past few decades. The course will cover the fundamentals of semiconductor photonic materials and devices, as well as new frontiers in green photonics, including integrated nanophotonic circuits and solar fuels. Important topics to be discussed include: solar cells, solar-to-hydrogen conversion, energy efficient nanophotonic devices including LEDs, lasers, and micro/nanoscale devices, as well as integrated nanophotonics.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Computational Data Science

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Raj Nadakuditi
Prerequisites: Programming experience in MATLAB, C, C++, Python or R

Course Description:
See attached flyer
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Computer Hardware Design for Machine Learning

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 (or 4 with an optional project)
Instructor: Zhengya Zhang
Prerequisites: EECS 427 or EECS 470

Course Description:
Machine learning has evolved rapidly in the last decade and it has become ubiquitous in applications from smart devices to self-driving cars. A key enabler of modern machine learning is the availability of low-cost, high-performance computer hardware, such as graphics processing units (GPUs) and specialized accelerators such as Googles tensor processing unit (TPU). New machine learning applications constantly impose new requirements and constraints on the hardware design. Hardware implementations must fit increasingly stringent area and power envelope. This course will survey the latest architecture and circuit designs for machine learning applications. Paper reviews and presentation will be the essential parts of this course. An optional unit can be earned by benchmarking or prototyping selected designs that leads to insightful conclusions.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Introduction to Algorithmic Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Dmitry Berenson
Prerequisites: EECS 280 is required, EECS 281 and MATH 214 are recommended

Course Description:
Build the foundation for your future in robotics:

-Convex Optimization-Motion Planning-Grasping-Point Cloud Processing-Probabilistic Reasoning-Kalman and Particle Filters
[More Info]

Election audits to debut in Mich. 2018 race

This article describes new measures to bolster security for Michigans 2018 midterm elections. Prof. J. Alex Halderman points out that additional progress can occur in the stat's process for auditing of paper ballots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Hottest Major

In this article, the Ann Arbor Observer reports on the pressures that have emerged due to the exploding enrollments in computer science classes. According to CSE Chair Brian Noble, CSE is constantly recruiting in an attempt to hire more faculty to handle the load. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Noble, Brian  

Igor Markov named a top Quora writer for fifth year in a row

Prof. Igor Markov has been named a top writer for 2018 on Quora, the question-and-answer site where questions are asked, answered, edited, and organized by its community of users. This is the fifth straight year that he has been ranked as a top writer on the site. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

U of M computer scientists might have solved mystery behind Cuba 'sonic attacks'

In this local news segment, Prof. Kevin Fu explains why the "sonic attacks" that poisoned diplomats in Cuba may have been the accidental effect of eavesdropping. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Cuba "sonic attacks" - a covert accident?

The purported "sonic attacks" that sickened U.S. and Canadian government workers in Cuba last year could have been an accidental side effect of attempted eavesdropping, says Prof. Kevin Fu, who with his colleagues reverse-engineered the attacks in a lab. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Can sound be used as a weapon? 4 questions answered

Were foreign diplomats and tourists in Cuba attacked with a "sonic weapon" or was it something else? Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators demonstrate a rational, evidence-based explanation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

New computing system to enable deep space missions

A new radiation-hardened, multi-processor, Arm-based spacecraft processor is being developed at Michigan in a project led by Boeing and funded by NASA. Prof. Ron Dreslinski is leading the research at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mudge, Trevor  

Comcast offers 1-gigabit service in SE Mich.

In this news report, Prof. Mosharaf Chowdhury comments on the potential impact of Comcast's forthcoming 1-gigabit residential and business service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Data and Computing  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

BMW, Toyota invest in U-M startup May Mobility

May Mobility, the autonomous vehicle microtransit company co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson to replace existing transportation systems with fleets of self-driving micro-shuttles, has announced that BMW i Ventures and Toyota AI Ventures have joined its investor-base. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

How Can We Trust a Robot?

This article by Prof. Benjamin Kuipers is featured in the March 2018 Communications of the ACM. Prof. Kuipers discusses how advances in artificial intelligence and robotics have raised concerns about the impact on our society of intelligent robots, unconstrained by morality or ethics. Includes a video interview with Prof. Kuipers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

BMW and Toyota are investing in a start-up that makes self-driving shuttles

May Mobility, cofounded by Prof. Edwin Olson, has received additional funding from BMW and Toyota for their autonomous shuttle technology. May hopes to get to market quickly by deploying shuttles on campuses and in other smaller-scale environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

How Artificial Intelligence Is Going To Affect The Financial Industry In 2018

Prof. Jason Mars, cofounder (with Prof. Lingjia Tang and others) of the AI startup firm Clinc, is interviewed in this article on the AI-driven conversational interface Clinc has developed for the banking industry. Clinc had sales of $4.5M in 2017 and his partnering with USAA to roll out their technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Prof. Michael Wellman participates in Asimov Memorial Debate

Michael Wellman, the Lynn A. Conway Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, participated in the recent Issac Asimov Memorial Debate on Artificial Intelligence, which was hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson. You can see the entire debate in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The Myth of the Hacker-Proof Voting Machine

This article describes the security holes that exist in today's electronic voting machines, including both the shortcomings of voting systems that do not provide paper backup and those of the systems that transmit electronic votes to counting centers. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who points to flaws in the protections for vote transmission systems put forth by vendors of paperless systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Pacemakers, defibrillators are potentially hackable

This article on the security of cardiac implants quotes Prof. Kevin Fu, who notes that limiting remote interactions would also address scenarios such as an old computer virus that unintentionally shuts down global operations of remote cardiac telemetry for hundreds of thousands of patients at once. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Electronic devices  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Prof. John Laird and CSE Alumna Shiwali Mohan receive award for research on learning in autonomous intelligent agents

Prof. John Laird and CSE alum Shiwali Mohan have received the Blue Sky Award at the 2018 Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence conference for their paper, Learning Fast and Slow: Levels of Learning in General Autonomous Intelligent Agents. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Laird, John  

Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, and his collaborators have created an automated chatbot that uses artificial intelligence to weed through the fine print of privacy policies so that you will know what you're agreeing to. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Shin, Kang G.  

The Training Of Dr. Robot: Data Wave Hits Medical Care

This article reports on how machine learning is revolutionizing the process of making medical diagnoses. It opens by highlighting the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens and her collaborators in predicting a hospital patient's likelihood of developing a problematic C-diff infection. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

Jia Deng selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Jia Deng has been selected for a 2018 Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for his work in computer vision and machine learning. He directs the Michigan Vision & Learning Lab and his research seeks to enable computers to see and think like humans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Michigan researchers predict emotions by examining the correlation between tweets and environmental factors

Research fellow Carmen Banea, alumna Vicki Liu, and Prof. Rada Mihalcea explored the concept of grounded emotions, focusing on how external factors, ranging from weather, news exposure, social network emotion charge, timing, and mood predisposition may have a bearing on ones emotion level throughout the day. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  

Risk Aware Autonomy - Moving Artificial Intelligence Forward

This short video highlights the work of CSE PhD student Dhanvin Mehta, who is working on an algorithm to help guide robots in uncertain environments with constantly changing variables, such as for autonomous vehicles driving among pedestrians who can suddenly change direction or speed without signaling. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

To Fight Fatal Infections, Hospitals May Turn to Algorithms

This article in Scientific American describes how machine learning is revolutionizing the process of making medical diagnoses. It opens by highlighting the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens and her collaborators in predicting a hospital patient's likelihood of developing a problematic C-diff infection. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

Transducer Sensors Suffer Security Risks Based on Physics, Not Malware

This article references the work of Prof. Kevin, Fu, who has demonstrated that physical manipulation can be used to trick transducers into reporting environmental data that is inaccurate. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

As cell phones proliferate in K-12, schools search for smart policies

This article includes a focus on the work of Thurnau Prof. Elliot Soloway, who is a proponent for the use of mobile tech in education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  

Persevering through the unknown: my conversation on emotion AI and problem solving with Emily Mower Provost

Prof. Emily Mower Provost was recently interviewed by the non-profit Iridescent - a company that brings science and engineering to underserved communities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  

Alumnus Rob Rutenbar receives Phil Kaufman Award for distinguished contributions to electronic system design

Dr. Rob A. Rutenbar (MSE, PhD CICE 1979, 1984), senior vice chancellor for Research at the University of Pittsburgh, has been honored with the Phil Kaufman Award for Distinguished Contributions to Electronic System Design. While at Michigan, we was co-advised by Profs. Daniel E. Atkins and Trevor Mudge. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Prof. Chad Jenkins Receives CoE Trudy Huebner Service Excellence Award

Chad Jenkins, associate professor in Computer Science and Engineering, received the 2017 2018 Trudy Huebner Service Excellence Award from the College of Engineering. This award recognizes his significant and consequential contributions in service to the academy and his professional communities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jenkins, Chad  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Collaborative master's program in data science announced

Developed and taught collaboratively by the faculty of the CSE Division of EECS in the College of Engineering, the Department of Statistics in the College of LSA, the Department of Biostatistics in the School of Public Health, and the School of Information, the Data Science master's program is now accepting applications for Fall 2018. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Education  Lab-Software Systems  

Michigan researchers awarded 2018 Applied Networking Research Prize for their work on speeding up the mobile web

A team of researchers, including Prof. Harsha Madhyastha and CSE graduate students Vaspol Ruamviboonsuk and Muhammed Uluyol have received the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) for their paper, "Vroom: Accelerating the Mobile Web with Server-Aided Dependency Resolution. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  

Ann Arbor's Duo Security announces record-breaking year

Duo Security, the Ann Arbor-based security firm founded by CSE alumni Dug Song and Jon Oberheide, has grown spectacularly. The firm not only met, but exceeded, their 2017 goals. Since 2016, Duo has tripled its staff from 200 to nearly 600. It is now considered a "unicorn" with a valuation of over $1B. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  

2018 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2018 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Peter Chen, Jason Corso, Jason Flinn, and PC Ku. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chen, Peter M.  Corso, Jason  Flinn, Jason  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  

Internet-scanning U-M startup pioneers new approach to cybersecurity

Ann Arbor-based Censys has launched based on work done over the past 5 years in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's lab. Censys is the first commercially available internet-wide scanning tool. It helps IT experts working to secure large networks, which are composed of a constantly changing array of devices ranging from servers to smartphones and internet-of-things devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

CS alum travels Africa by motorcycle, planting the seeds of programming

Levi Weintraub (BSE CS 2006) left his job at Google to travel the world. He has ended up in Tanzania, where he has set up an IT training program. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

DARPA funds six centers working on computer design alternatives

This article reports on the six centers that DARPA has funded to jumpstart the computer computer architecture development. The $32M Applications Driving Architectures center, based at U-M and led by Prof. Valeria Bertacco, is one of them. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Raymond Fok selected as finalist for CRA UG research award; two others receive honorable mention

CS undergraduate student Raymond Fok was selected as a finalist for CRA's Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award. The award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American colleges and universities who show outstanding potential in an area of computing research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Reimagining how computers are designed: University of Michigan leads new $32M center

The Center for Applications Driving Architectures, or ADA, at the University of Michigan will develop a transformative, "plug-and-play" ecosystem to encourage a flood of fresh ideas in computing frontiers such as autonomous control, robotics and machine-learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

U-M startup May Mobility blazes toward autonomous fleet market

May Mobility, co-founded and led by Prof. Edwin Olson, has tested its autonomous vehicles on the streets of Downtown Detroit. The startup recently licensed five autonomous driving related technologies from U-M, and outside of the life sciences, is the most successful UM startup in raising first round of funding so quickly. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

CSE Researchers Funded to Enhance Online Communication

Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki have been awarded two grants from Trove.ai, an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup, to develop novel methods and tools that will unleash the power of online communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

All CSE News for 2018